Trout Lakes

Lake Ozonia

SPECIAL REGULATIONS ALLOW FOR YEAR-ROUND ANGLING ON LAKE OZONIA.

Lake Ozonia is essentially trout water, but anglers should not overlook the warmwater fishing on these lakes. Ozonia has smallmouth bass and panfish; yellow perch are particularly abundant. Look for fish along weededges, shoreline cover, tributary mouths, and rocky areas.

This 397-acre lake receives annual stockings of rainbow trout and splake numbering 5,000. In recent years, Lake Ozonia has also been stocked with lake trout, landlocked salmon, and two-year-old browns. A DEC cartop launch located off the Lake Ozonia Road offers year-round access. The launch site has a ten-horsepower restriction on outboard motors. Whether anglers use a gas or electric-powered motor, trolling is the preferred fishing technique. Spring and autumn produce the best results, and prime trolling spots include shorelines, bays, and points. Some anglers troll flies on a sinking fly line, some troll small minnow plugs using leadcore line, and others use monofilament line to troll Lake Clear wabbler and worm rigs. 

Trout Lake

Trout Lake is essentially trout water, but anglers should not overlook the warmwater fishing on these lakes. Trout Lake has largemouth and smallmouth bass as well as panfish. This lake hosts a kids’ rock bass derby every summer. Look for fish along weededges, shoreline cover, tributary mouths, and rocky areas.

Trout Lake has a reputation for offering quality rainbow trout and lake trout fishing. Every year the DEC stocks a combined four to ten thousand rainbows and lakers in the deep-water lake. Landlocked salmon have also been stocked on this 371-acre lake, and special regulations allow for year-round angling. Public access is carry-in from state land, but there is a paved launch by the County Route 19 Bridge that boaters can use for a small fee. Because of its low elevation, the ice typically goes out of Trout Lake earlier than it does in nearby Adirondack lakes. This makes Trout Lake an angler-favorite in early spring. Trout can be found throughout the lake, but the northern half has the better fish-holding structure.

Sylvia Lake

Sylvia Lake is essentially trout water, but anglers should not overlook the warmwater fishing on these lakes. Sylvia Lake has largemouth and smallmouth bass. Look for fish along weededges, shoreline cover, tributary mouths, and rocky areas.

Sylvia Lake resembles Trout Lake in several ways. Both are deep-water lakes; both hold populations of rainbows and lakers; and both see early ice-out because of low elevation. SYLVIA LAKE HAS BEEN KNOWN TO YIELD LAKE TROUT WEIGHING MORE THAN 20 POUNDS. Annual stockings at this 314-acre lake number 3,000 rainbow trout measuring nine inches. Since 75 percent of the lake is privately developed, most anglers prefer fishing during the quiet times of spring and fall when shoreline dropoffs in the 10- to 40-foot range are productive. Bait fishers use live minnows for lake trout and worms for rainbows. Cartop access is available from a spur road off State Route 812.

Star Lake

Star Lake is essentially trout water, but anglers should not overlook the warmwater fishing on these lakes. Star Lake has largemouths, smallmouths, and panfish. Look for fish along weededges, shoreline cover, tributary mouths, and rocky areas.

Lake trout and brown trout have been stocked in Star Lake, but this 208-acre water is essentially a rainbow trout and landlocked salmon fishery. Annual stockings number 2,000 rainbows measuring nine inches and 1,000 salmon measuring 6.5 inches. Because nearly three quarters of the lake has private development, anglers find that the best fishing opportunities are in the spring and fall when the fish are active and the campers are inactive. Access requiring a 75-yard carry is available just of State Route 3. Trolling flies, wabblers and worms, and minnow plugs is the most popular technique, but drifting a jig and minnow or a spinner and worm is also effective. Because of numerous bays and arms, anglers can find fishable water here even on windy days. Star Lake is open to year-round angling.

Portaferry Lake

Located nine miles northeast of Harrisville, Portaferry Lake has rainbow and brown trout. This 79-acre lake sees an annual stocking of 500 trout, and anglers will find cartop access at a state-owned site off State Route 3.

Massawepie Lake

Massawepie Lake is essentially trout water, but anglers should not overlook the warmwater fishing on these lakes. Massawepie Lake has a healthy population of big bronzebacks. Look for fish along weededges, shoreline cover, tributary mouths, and rocky areas.

Over the years, Massawepie Lake has been stocked with various species including lake trout, rainbow trout, brown trout, and landlocked salmon. This 437-acre lake falls under the Massawepie Conservation Easement, and certain restrictions apply. For example, the use of baitfish is prohibited, and the lake is closed to the public from June 15 through August 31 so that the area may be used for Boy Scout Camp. Trout fishers concentrate their efforts on the lake’s numerous points, shoreline dropoffs, and two tributary mouths. Cartop access is available from two points along the Massawepie Road.

Water Type

Ponds & Small Lakes

Fishing Seasons

Fall Spring Summer Winter